top of page
04 Galah_edited_edited.png
Koala (2).jpg

Australia's 
Native Wildlife

WTWpic (3).png
Kookaburra.jpg
AusAnimalIcon3.JPG
SFSPic (3).png

Koala

Did you know?!

  • Koalas are famous for eating eucalyptus leaves.

  • They have a very long digestive system that helps break down the tough fibrous leaves. 

  • Koalas are known for being some of the sleepiest animals around. They can sleep for up to 20 hours a day! This is because eucalyptus leaves have very little energy.

Baby koalas are called 'joeys'. When born, they are tiny, blind and furless.

Koalas are endangered and must be protected especially during bushfire season in south east Queensland. 

Koala (2).jpg

Blue Tongue Lizard
 

Did you know?!

  • Blue tongue lizard's are named for their unique defence mechanism, their blue tongue! 

  • When threatened they open their mouth to frighten their predators. 

  • Blue tongue lizards are omnivore which means they eat both plants and small animals, they enjoy insects, snails, fruits and flowers. In captivity, their lifespan can be up to 20 years!

  • Blue tongue lizards are primarily active during the day, and are often seen baking in the sun.

These unique lizards are fascinating creatures that play an important role in ecosystems by helping control insect populations and serving as a valuable part of the food chain. 

Regularly seen around parks in Australia, Luna had one move into her home and take up residence under her fridge! Her children named him "Ralph", only to later discover he was a 'she' when her baby joined not long after.

BlueTongue (1).jpg

Kookaburra

Did you know?!

  • Kookaburras are known for their distinctive call, which sounds like a loud echoing laughter.

  • This vocalisation is often used to mark territory and communicate with other kookaburras. It's one of the most recognisable sounds in the Australian bush

  • Kookaburras are carnivores birds. They primarily feed on small insects, small mammals, reptiles including snakes.

  • Kookaburras often live in family groups. 

  • They are commonly seen and  heard in parks and within su burbs. Luna often spots them sitting on her pool fence!

 

Check out 'Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree' by Marion Sinclair to listen to an iconic piece of Australian culture. 

Kookaburra (1).jpg
Open Book

Discover the adventures of Koko-Possum and MarMa-llama!

bottom of page